Top 5 Fears of New Moms

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Becoming a new mom can be overwhelming, wonderful and terrifying all at once. Exhaustion from lack of sleep can amplify the typical concerns that come from having a little one in the home. If you are anxious after bringing home your new baby, learning the realities behind some of your fears may help you overcome them.

  1. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Many new moms are worried their baby will suffer SIDS and die in their sleep. It’s important to know that sudden infant death syndrome is very rare and there are ways you can greatly reduce your baby’s risk. Make sure your baby is put to sleep on his or her back, keep your baby’s bed in your room, and keep your baby’s crib free of pillows and stuffed animals.
  2. Inability To Nurse: It can be nerve-wracking if you’re unable to breastfeed your new baby immediately. It’s actually pretty rare that a woman physically can’t breastfeed, but many women do struggle to get it down at first. A lactation consultant may be able to help you learn the ins and outs of breastfeeding.
  3. Preparing For Baby At Home: There can be so much to do before you bring baby home from the hospital. It’s important to prioritize things like a safe car seat, well-made crib, clothes, receiving blankets and diapers and wipes.
  4. Not Bonding With Baby: While some new moms bond with their baby before it’s even born, others take some time. If you’re feeling PPD (also known as the baby blues), try to catch up on your sleep, allow friends and family to help as much as possible and get out of the house, even if just to get groceries.
  5. Mishandling Baby: Because babies are so small and fragile, many people worry they are going to mishandle him or her. The reality, however, is that most new parents feel this way and the chances of something like this actually happening are very slim. If you have a valid concern, call your pediatrician.

For more new parenting and safety tips, continue to check in on the Medical City Children’s Urgent Care blog. Medical City Children’s Urgent Care is a kid-friendly medical facility dedicated to providing children the best possible care.

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you or your child.

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What to Expect at a Sports Physical

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Whether in middle school or high school, every student athlete is required to have a sports physical before their season can begin. While sports physicals may seem unnecessary, they are crucial to ensure your child is healthy enough to participate in a sport. If your child is nervous about the sports physical and unsure what to expect, you may be able to ease their mind with the following information.

The Basics

Each doctor is different, but every physician will want to record your child’s height, weight, blood pressure, pulse and heart rate. He or she will then take a look at your child’s eyes, ears, nose and throat. You should take this time to fill the doctor in on any recent hospitalizations or surgeries your child’s had since he or she was last seen.

Family History

If you are visiting a new doctor, he or she will want to know about any serious illnesses within your immediate family. Diseases that are known to be hereditary, such as heart disease and diabetes, are especially important to note.

Medications

Make sure you let you child’s doctor know of any medication he or she is currently taking. You should note even something as minor as a daily vitamin or aspirin.

Your child’s doctor will likely offer training tips to keep him or her healthy and active the entire season. It’s important to remember that a sports physical focuses on your child’s well being as it relates to sports and does not substitute an annual physical.

If your child is in need of a back-so-school physical, consider visiting Medical City Children’s Urgent Care. We have kid-friendly physicians that are board-eligible in family medicine or emergency medicine, offer convenient access to the expert care you need right when you need it and are even open after hours or on the weekend.

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you or your child.

Teaching Your Child After-School Safety

MomNDaughterSchool.jpgAs your child gets ready to head back to school, you’ve likely met their teacher, bought all new school supplies and even stocked the fridge with plenty of after-school snacks. However, it’s imperative you walk through potential after-school safety issues as well. Whether your child walks home from school, stays late for after-school activities or takes the bus home immediately following classes, there are precautions you and your child should always take.

Pick-ups

Most of the time, after-school pick-ups are the safest route to go. However, it’s important that you let the school know if someone is picking your child up other than you. When picking up your child, determine a specific time and meeting place. If he or she isn’t at the pre-decided spot at the right time, you may know something isn’t right.

Walking

If your child is planning to walk home from school, it’s important you know the exact route he or she takes each day. If your child is younger, walk the route with them the first couple of trips to ensure they don’t get lost.  You can also help other children by driving slowly when in school zones or other routine paths that children take.

Stay at Home

If your child is going to stay at home alone after school, make sure they have a key to the house. They should know to always lock all doors and windows as soon as they get home and to not open them to anyone. Emergency contact information should be easily accessible as well.

Strangers

No matter if your child is being picked up after school or walking home, it’s smart to review potential stranger dangers with them. Teach your child to always make loud noises when being approached by a stranger that makes them feel uncomfortable. Also make sure your child knows where to run for help if needed.

For more safety tips, continue to check in on the Medical City Children’s Urgent Care blog. Medical City Children’s Urgent Care is a kid-friendly medical facility dedicated to providing children the best possible care.

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you or your child.

 

 

When to See a Doctor for Diarrhea

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Because it typically resolves without any treatment, most people don’t think twice when they have diarrhea. However, severe diarrhea can cause a myriad of other issues, including dehydration. Diarrhea is most dangerous for children, the elderly and those who already have a weak immune system. Knowing when to seek medical help for diarrhea is essential to recovering quickly before things become severe.

Diarrhea in Children

Because children are already more susceptible to suffering complications from diarrhea, they should be seen by a doctor if it lasts longer than 24 hours. If your child also suffers from a fever of 102 degrees Fahrenheit or higher, has blood or black stools and has not had at least three wet diapers in a 24-hour time span, you should also take them to a doctor immediately.

Diarrhea in Adults

Typically, diarrhea in adults is more likely to resolve on its own. If your diarrhea lasts more than two days, however, you should visit a doctor. Signs of dehydration, such as dry mouth, dizziness, excessive thirst and lack of urination, are also an indication you should see a doctor. If you have a fever higher than 102 degrees Fahrenheit, have severe abdominal pain or have bloody or black stools, you should also seek medical care as soon as possible.

Treating Diarrhea

If you are suffering from diarrhea, but don’t believe it’s serious enough to seek medical treatment, it’s important to take frequent small sips of water. You should also take small bites of saltine crackers. As soon as you start feeling better, you may begin eating mild foods, but it’s advised that you avoid spicy foods, fruits and caffeine for at least two days after symptoms have dissipated. For children, treatment should include oral rehydration solutions like Pedialyte, increased carbohydrates in the diet and supplementation with probiotics.

If you or your child is suffering from severe diarrhea, consider seeking medical attention at Medical City Children’s Urgent Care. We have kid-friendly physicians that are board-eligible in family medicine or emergency medicine, offer convenient access to the expert care you need right when you need it and are even open after hours or on the weekend.

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you or your child.

How to Prevent Mosquito Bites

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During the summer, kids can spend hours outside each day. While being outdoors is a great way for kids to stay active, it’s also a great way for them to get attacked by mosquitoes. In addition to being pesky, mosquitoes carry a number of diseases, including Zika and West Nile virus. (If you are pregnant and interested in traveling somewhere Zika has spread, you should consult with your doctor.)

Knowing how mosquitoes operate is key to repelling them. Follow these few tips to keep your kids (and yourself) free of bites this summer.

Keep It Breezy

The slightest breeze can keep mosquitoes at bay. Researchers have learned that mosquitoes have great difficulty flying in any breeze over 1 MPH, so try to find a breezy spot or get a fan set up outside to avoid these pesky creatures. It’s a good idea to keep the fan pointed downward as mosquitoes usually fly close to the ground in an effort to avoid wind.

Wear Tighter Clothing

It’s much more difficult for mosquitoes to bite if your clothes have a tight weave. Synthetic fibers work well to keep bugs away, especially high-tech athletic apparel.

Dress in Light Colors

Because mosquitoes rely on their vision in order to find food, dark colors typically stand out to them. By wearing lighter colors, you will be less likely to attract them.

Avoid Dusk and Dawn

During these times of day, the wind usually slows down. Less wind equals more mosquitoes, so try to schedule any outdoor activities during other times of the day.

Don’t Mess With Wearables

Many people swear by DEET wristbands, anklets, etc. Unfortunately, the DEET must be spread on your skin to have an effect, so these items won’t do much to keep away insects.

Wear DEET!

Insect repellants containing DEET can greatly help prevent mosquito bites. It’s important to note that DEET should not be used on children 2 months of age or younger. It is recommended that you use 10% to 30% DEET for best results. For two hours of protection, choose 10% DEET, while 30% DEET while protect for about five hours. Picaridin has also become a nice alternative to DEET, available in concentrations of 5% to 10%.

For more summer tips and up-to-date medical information, continue to check in on the Medical City Children’s Urgent Care blog.

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you or your child.

Affordable Summer Field Trips for Kids

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During the summer, it’s easy for kids to get bored without school to keep them busy. If you are ready for your kids to get out and about, consider taking them on a fun field trip alone or with a group of friends. Many people think field trips require a lot of money, but there are a number of them that are very affordable. Next time your kids get antsy to do something this summer, consider one of the field trip options below.

Nature Hike

Early in the morning, before it gets too hot outside, take a trip to a local nature preserve or hiking trail. Print out a fun natural trail checklist so the kids can make a check whenever they spot an acorn, ladybug, feather, etc.

Orchard

Not only will your kids love seeing where apples, cherries, lemons, etc. come from, most orchards will let you take some fruit home with you. With the fruit you receive, you can make a pie or bake something else that lets your kids see fruit from start to finish.

Bakery

Many local bakeries love to show kids what goes on behind the scenes. Call ahead and make sure your bakery allows “tours.” It’s not unusual to get a sweet treat out of the deal too!

Ballgame

While Major League Baseball tickets can get pricey, most towns have at least one minor league team that offers tickets at a very discounted price. Many ballparks even have special games where they cater to kids or give away cool items.

Animal Shelter

Take your kids to the local animal shelter and spend some time with the adoptable dogs and cats. Not only will your kids love this, the animals will be grateful for some much needed TLC!

For more fun summer tips, continue to check in on the Medical City Children’s Urgent Care blog. Medical City Children’s Urgent Care is a kid-friendly medical facility dedicated to providing children the best possible care.

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you or your child.

 

 

5 Kid-Friendly Side Dishes for BBQs

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Summer BBQs can be a great family activity. But if you have picky eaters, it can be difficult to find side dishes that everyone will enjoy. These five kid-friendly side dishes will have the kids begging for more at your next cookout.

Macaroni & Cheese

You’d be hard pressed to find a kid that doesn’t like macaroni and cheese. Homemade macaroni and cheese doesn’t have to be difficult to make either. The main ingredients are simple: macaroni, butter, whole milk, cheddar cheese and flour are all it takes to make a delicious side dish. See the full mac and cheese recipe here.

Fruit Kabobs

This is a great side dish to have the kids help make. Cut up your children’s favorite fruits and simply have them stick the fruit onto a kabob stick (these can be bought in most grocery stores). Good fruit choices for kabobs include: cantaloupe, grapes, strawberries, honeydew melon and watermelon.

Sweet Potato Fries

A healthier take on traditional fries, sweet potato fries can be made by simply slicing sweet potatoes, tossing them in olive oil, sprinkling with seasoning and baking for 20 minutes.

Baked Beans

There are a number of great canned baked beans that make this a great easy side dish that the whole family will love. Beans are a great source of fiber too, so this dish is both nutritious and delicious. For added taste, cut up cooked bacon and add to beans before cooking.

Watermelon

No recipe needed for this side! Simply cut up fresh watermelon and serve. At only 40 calories per cup, watermelon is full of vitamins A, B and C. Make sure kids know that watermelon has seeds before eating.

For more healthy summer tips, continue to check in on the Medical City Children’s Urgent Care blog. Medical City Children’s Urgent Care is a kid-friendly medical facility dedicated to providing children the best possible care.

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you or your child.