When Is A Urinary Catheter Needed?

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When hearing the words urinary catheter (often also referred to as a foley catheter), we often relate it to elderly people. However, there are instances where a young child may need a urinary catheter. While it isn’t the most pleasant thing to imagine for your child, it can be necessary. Read below to see when your child may need a urinary catheter.

WHAT IS A URINARY CATHETER

A soft, thin flexible tube, a urinary catheter is placed into the bladder to help drain urine. This can either be done in an operating room, exam room or hospital room.

WHEN IS A URINARY CATHETER NEEDED

If your child has recently undergone surgery, suffered an injury or developed a sickness that prevents him or her from getting up to use the restroom, a catheter may be needed. Some medication may also cause your child to have difficulty emptying his or her bladder, which would require a catheter.

In some cases, a urinary tract infection is suspected and the child is too young to provide a specimen. In this situation, a catheter may be gently inserted in order to obtain a specimen for urinalysis and urine culture.

In rare instances, your child’s doctor may need to measure exactly how much urine your child passes, which can be done through the use of a catheter.

HOW A CATHETER IS PLACED

If your child needs a urine catheter, he or she will lie on an exam table or hospital bed while a doctor prepares to insert the catheter. On one end of the catheter is a balloon, while the other end has two ports that are use to inflate the balloon and collect the urine. A doctor will use a lubricant to help slide the catheter in as painlessly as possible.

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If you believe your child needs a urinary catheter, rest assured that Medical City Children’s Urgent Care has pediatricians that are board certified, offer convenient access to the expert care you need right when you need it and are even open after hours or on the weekend.

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you or your child.

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5 Holiday Volunteer Opportunities For Kids

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The holidays can be a wonderful time to spoil your children with all the gifts they’ve been wanting throughout the year. However, it can also be a great time to teach them the power of volunteering and helping others. The holidays are a great time to take your child to a food bank, assisted living home, etc. since they are often off school for several weeks at the end of the year. If you are looking for volunteer opportunities for your child, consider the following options.

  1. Work at a food pantry: Not only can you donate food items to your local food pantry, you can also have your child help volunteer at the shelter. Many food shelters need help stocking the pantry, organizing items and even helping to check out customers. This is a great way for your child to learn the value of helping those less fortunate
  2. Visit a nursing home: Having your child spend time at a nursing home is a mutually beneficial way to volunteer. Many of the elderly people living at the assisted living homes look forward to having young kids to spend time with and your children will learn how to interact with those that are older than them. Consider having your child make holiday cards for those at the nursing home and hand deliver the cards right before the holidays.
  3. Deliver meals: If you have time a couple days before the holidays or even on the day of, delivering meals is a great way to volunteer. There are many local charity food services that are always looking for people who can hand deliver hot meals and companionship to those in need.
  4. Visit an animal shelter: The animals at the local animal shelter are desperate for affection and attention. If your child is an animal lover, consider visiting your local animal shelter. Whether you take the animals on a walk or clean up dirty litter boxes, any bit of help will be much appreciated.
  5. Clean up outside: Find a local park or simply walk through your neighborhood picking up trash with your child. When you do this, it’s important you and your child wear gloves and that you supervise your child closely to ensure nothing dangerous is picked up.

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For more holiday and health tips for children, continue to check in on the Medical City Children’s Urgent Care blog. Medical City Children’s Urgent Care is a kid-friendly medical facility dedicated to providing children the best possible care. We have pediatricians that are board certified, offer convenient access to the expert care you need right when you need it and are even open after hours or on the weekend.

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you or your child.

How Dangerous is RSV for Children?

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Respiratory syncytial virus, more commonly known as RSV, can very easily be confused for a cold. If a child wakes up in the night with a cough, fever, stuffy nose and crankiness, it’s not unusual for a parent to diagnose this as just another cold. However, an estimated 57,000 children under the age of five are hospitalized annually due to an RSV infection, making it imperative you know the difference between RSV and the common cold.

WHO’S AT RISK?

For most infants and children, RSV will do no more than produce symptoms of the common cold. But for very young infants, children with chronic lung or heart disease, children with a weakened immune system and children with neuromuscular disorders, RSV can turn into bronchiolitis or even pneumonia.

EARLY SYMPTOMS

It’s crucial to catch RSV symptoms as early as possible in an effort to minimize effects. Early symptoms of RSV include runny nose, decrease in appetite and a cough that could lead to wheezing.

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TREATING RSV

If your child has contracted RSV, there are a few things you can do to help him or her recover quickly. Make sure your child is staying hydrated first and foremost. Have your child blow their nose regularly and give him or her pain relievers such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen when needed. (It’s important you don’t give your child aspirin as it’s been linked to several different diseases.) If your child is unable to blow his or her nose, the most effective treatment is a nasal saline irrigation and suction. Finally, a cool-mist vaporizer can help your child breathe better during the dry winter months.

PREVENTING RSV

If your child is at a heightened risk for RSV, there are a few things you can do to keep him or healthy, especially during the fall, winter and early spring when RSV is most common.

  • Have your child wash his or her hands regularly. Proper hand washing lasts 20 seconds and includes warm water and soap.
  • Avoid being in close contact with sick people. RSV is extremely contagious, so telling your child to not share utensils or eat after other children is very important.
  • Clean all surfaces in your home regularly. This includes objects that are touched regularly such as toys, doorknobs, etc.

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If you believe your child is suffering from RSV, consider visiting Medical City Children’s Urgent Care. We have pediatricians that are board certified, offer convenient access to the expert care you need right when you need it and are even open after hours or on the weekend.

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you or your child.

How To Avoid 3 Common Illnesses This Winter

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Each year as the weather cools down, the number of illness increases. There are certain illnesses that peak during the winter months, including the flu, ear infections and bronchiolitis. To keep from catching these widespread illnesses, there are several things you can do.

  1. Seasonal Flu: Flu season begins as early as the fall and continues through May, with January and February as the worst two months for the sickness. Because the flu is so easily spread from one person to another, it’s one of the hardest illnesses to avoid. In fact, as many as 20% of the population will be affected by the flu annually. The illness, which is spread by coughing, sneezing and even just talking, can be prevented by regular hand washing, avoiding eating after others and constant cleaning of regularly-touched surfaces
  2. Ear Infection: As a result of changes in climate, ear infections are most common during the winter months. Caused by bacteria that are often accompanied by a sore throat, cold or other respiratory infection, an ear infection occurs when fluid builds up behind the eardrum. While an ear infection is difficult to prevent, your child can greatly reduce his or her risk of coming down with one by washing hands frequently, getting vaccinated every year and staying away from second-hand smoke.
  3. Bronchiolitis: Mostly impacting children under the age of two, bronchiolitis is a result of swelling and mucus buildup within the smallest lung air passages. Typically, bronchiolitis is contagious when your child comes in direct contact with fluids of an infected person. Teaching your child to wash his or her hands frequently—along with disinfecting regularly touched items—can make a huge difference in your child’s health this winter.

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If your child has managed to come down with an illness this winter, consider visiting Medical City Children’s Urgent Care. We have pediatricians that are board certified, offer convenient access to the expert care you need right when you need it and are even open after hours or on the weekend.

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you or your child.